Is It Beautiful or Useful? Resolution for 2015

happy new year

I remember hearing this sage Feng Shui advice: when de-cluttering your living or working space, look at everything in your environment with the discerning question: “Does this object bring beauty or is it useful?” If it is neither of these things, then promptly throw it out. I have decided to apply this principle to other aspects in my life in the New Year.

This is my so-called “New Year’s Resolution.”

When you live with a daily chronic illness, as I do, time and energy are hot commodities. I have to make discerning choices as to how I am going to expend my limited resources. But it can be difficult at times to determine what the right choices are. Especially when you start to factor in concerns over other people’s feelings and obligations you feel you “should” fulfill.

Then I realized, what if I ask myself the above question: “Is this activity going to bring beauty/joy into my life or is it useful?”

In the first category are all the activities that bring me the most fulfillment, spiritually or emotionally. They are the things that make life worth living. They are the little bits of sunshine that carry me through the cloudy moments; the Beacons of Hope amidst the storm that will surely come.

The second category may not bring an immediate sense of happiness or beauty, but are necessary tasks for my continued survival. These are doctor’s appointments to maintain my state of being, procedures to treat my health, daily exercise to “oil” my joints and increase my mobility, keeping my living space free of clutter, and taking time to plan and prepare healthy meals. Also, landing here, is taking the time to evaluate things I cannot do on my own, and then asking for help from others.

It’s much easier for me to fill up the list with “activities that bring beauty and joy into my life.” And, as much as I need to look at the pile of activities that bring me joy, and rate them from “most joy” to “least,” just by asking the initial question, I have already weeded out all the things we as humans engage in just because we think it is what we should be doing, or what others expect from us.

Going to work each day, even when it is not the most satisfying, is useful because it brings home money to live and thrive. Going to lunch with a co-worker that generally annoys just because you are afraid to say no, is not useful nor beautiful. That time could be spent doing an activity for 45 minutes that feeds your soul so that you can return to work more light-hearted.

For me and others with chronic illness, we have what has been coined as a “limited amount of spoons” each day. Every time we have to expend energy (any amount), we have to give up a spoon (or two, or three). Once our daily allotment are gone, they are gone. Too often, I forget this. I start trying to hand out forks and knives, items that really are only on loan and carry a steep penalty. I am borrowing against myself. And then I will pay in the days following when I have nothing left in reserve and my body shuts down. Completely.

This year, I want to do differently. I want to respect my body. To honor its limitations. To realize that if I pay heed to the true amount of energy I have then I can enjoy a small amount of truly meaningful activities each day.

I want to recognize that many times the activities that bring the most beauty and joy into my life are ones of quiet solitude. Moments of peaceful participation in painting or writing or reading or just sitting and listening to music.

I want to pause when someone invites me out for an activity and listen inward to see if my heart is singing with the beauty of this possibility. Or, if it is sighing with resignation because I feel like I need to fulfill an obligation.

It has only been just under one day into the New Year, but I have already applied the “Beauty and Usefulness Principle” to each moment of this day. And, you know what? It has both kept me fully present and making conscious choices throughout my day, big and small. I have balanced my choices by spending some time throwing out old clutter (useful) and prepping a canvas to paint sometime in the next few days (beauty/joy). I have kept each activity short, with periods of rest in between.

My heart feels full and satisfied.

Try out this barometer question when facing various choices in the next several days, and see where your heart leads you.

And may reading this give you support if you live with chronic illness, or understanding if you are a friend to someone struggling daily. When we have to say no to an invitation, it isn’t saying no to you, it is recognizing and honoring our own limitations. By staying true to ourselves, we are true to others.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

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2 thoughts on “Is It Beautiful or Useful? Resolution for 2015

  1. It seems many of us are on a similar path. I have been realizing that I often overextend myself and recently declared an intention that I say “YES!” to opportunities to enrich my life and think twice about doing things out of feeling “needed”. Being of service is still important, but with more balance.

    • What a wonderful new year’s gift to give yourself: balance in all things. Even in service, I have found a difference between what my heart s drawn to and what I do out of sheer obligation. And when I listen to my heart, all parties involved benefit.

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